Tuesday, September 22, 2015

100 Rare New Testament Translations and Versions on DVDrom

Buy Now Only $5.35 (I only ship to the United States)

Books Scanned from the Originals into PDF format


Books are in the public domain. I will take checks or money orders as well. Ask me about volume discounts. For a list of all of my disks, with links click here

Contents of Disk (created on a Windows computer):

The New Testament from the Greek text as established by Bible Numerics by Ivan Panin 1914

A New Version of the Gospel according to Saint Matthew by Isaac de Beausobre 1816

Translation of the New Testament by WB Godbey 1902

A TRANSLATION OF THE NEW TESTAMENT from the Original Greek Humbly Attempted with a View to Assist the Unlearned by T Haweis 1795

A Literal Translation of the 8 Last Books of the New Testament by F Parker 1854

A Revised Translation of the New Testament by Henry Highton 1862

The Riverside New Testament - A Translation From The Original Greek Into The English Of To-Day by W Ballentine 1922

The Twentieth Century New Testament - a translation into Modern English made from Westcott & Hort's text 1898 Volume 1

The Twentieth Century New Testament - a translation into Modern English made from Westcott & Hort's text 1898 Volume 2

The Twentieth Century New Testament - a translation into Modern English made from Westcott & Hort's text 1898 Volume 3

The Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and book of Revelation commonly called the New Testament, a new translation from a revised text of the Greek original (Unknown Translator) 1800

The New Testament Scriptures in the order in which they were written, a very close translation from the Greek text of 1611, with brief explanations by Charles Hebert 1882

The Family Expositor - A paraphrase and version of the New Testament 1831 by Philip Doddridge

The New Testament by James Moffatt 1913

The Revised New Testament 1881

The New Testament of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ : the common English version, corrected by the final committee of the American Bible Union 1865

The New Testament by Charles Foster Kent 1918

Hebrew New Testament by Franz Delitzsch 1901

New Testament by George R Noyes 1888

The New Testament Emphasized by Horace Morrow 1897

The New Testament by HT Anderson 1865

Primitive New Testament by William Whiston 1745



The New Testament in English according to the Version by John Wycliffe 1879

The New Dispensation by Robert Weekes 1897

A Liberal Translation of the New Testament by Ed Harwood, Volume 1, 1768

A Liberal Translation of the New Testament by Ed Harwood, Volume 2, 1768

New Testament by Sylvanus Cobb 1864

The New Testament, A New and Corrected Version by R Dickinson 1833

New Testament by Gilbert Wakefield 1820

The New Testament Being the English Only of the Greek and English Testament by Abner Kneeland 1823

Heinfetter New Testament 1864

James Murdoch New Testament 1851

Jonathan Morgan New Testament 1848

Edgar Taylor New Testament 1840

New Testament by Leicester Ambrose Sawyer 1860

The New Testament in an Improved Version upon the basis of Archbishop Newcome's New Translation 1809

Richard Wynne New Testament 1764

The Epistles of Paul in Modern English by George Barker Stevens 1898

The Messages of the Apostles by George Barker Stevens 1900

The Corrected English New Testament - A Revision of the Authorised Version by Samuel Lloyd 1904

The Interlinear Literal Translation Of The Greek New Testament - Thomas Newberry, George Berry

The New Testament the Authorized Version Corrected by Edward Clarke 1913

Palfrey's New Testament in the Common Version conformed to Greisbach's Greek Text 1830

Rotherham's New Testament 1893



Samuel Sharpe's New Testament 1862

Weymouth's New Testament 1909

John Wesley New Testament 1754

The Sermon on the Mount and other extracts from the New Testament - a verbatim translation from the Greek with notes on the mystical or arcane sense by James Morgan Pryse 1904

The Chronological New Testament according to the Authorized version by Robert Bladaker 1864

The New Covenant by JW Hanson 1884

The New Testament translated from the critical text of Von Tischendorf by Samuel Davidson 1875

Tyndale's New Testament 1837

The Gospel According to St Matthew and part of the first chapter of St Mark by John Cheke 1843

The New Testament Revised and Translated by AS Worrell 1904

The Sacred Writings of the Apostles and Evangelists of Jesus Christ, commonly styled the New Testament by Alexander Campbell 1914

The Epistle of Paul, Volume 1 by Thomas Belsham 1822

The Epistle of Paul, Volume 2 by Thomas Belsham 1822

The Epistle of Paul, Volume 3 by Thomas Belsham 1822

The Epistle of Paul, Volume 4 by Thomas Belsham 1822

St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans by WG Rutherford 1900

St. Paul's epistles to the Thessalonians and to the Corinthians by WG Rutherford 1908

A Paraphrase on the Acts of the Holy Apostles, upon all the Epistles of the New Testament, and upon the Revelations by Thomas Pyle, Volume 1, 1817

A Paraphrase on the Acts of the Holy Apostles, upon all the Epistles of the New Testament, and upon the Revelations by Thomas Pyle, Volume 2, 1817

A Paraphrase on the Acts of the Holy Apostles, upon all the Epistles of the New Testament, and upon the Revelations by Thomas Pyle, Volume 3, 1817

Translation of the Gospels, Volume 1 by Andrews Norton 1856

Translation of the Gospels, Volume 2 by Andrews Norton 1856

A New Literal Translation from the Original Greek, of All the Apostolical Epistles by James MacKnight 1806

The Four Gospels, translated from the Greek, Volume 1, by George Campbell, 1837

The Four Gospels, translated from the Greek, Volume 2, by George Campbell, 1837

An Exposition of the New Testament by William Gilpin 1790

The Life and Morals Of Jesus Of Nazareth by Thomas Jefferson 1904

Daniel Mace New Testament 1729

The Commonly Received Version of the New Testament of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ with Several Hundred Emendations 1850 Edited by Spencer Houghton Cone and William Henry Wyckoff

The New Testament for English Readers Containing the Authorized Version with Marginal Corrections of Readings and Renderings, Marginal References and a Critical and Explanatory Commentary 1868 Volume 1 by Henry Alford

The New Testament for English Readers Containing the Authorized Version with Marginal Corrections of Readings and Renderings, Marginal References and a Critical and Explanatory Commentary 1868 Volume 2 by Henry Alford

The New Testament for English Readers Containing the Authorized Version with Marginal Corrections of Readings and Renderings, Marginal References and a Critical and Explanatory Commentary 1868 Volume 3 by Henry Alford

The New Testament for English Readers Containing the Authorized Version with Marginal Corrections of Readings and Renderings, Marginal References and a Critical and Explanatory Commentary 1868 Volume 4 by Henry Alford



New Testament Translated from the Latin Vulgate by Francis Patrick Kenrick 1862

A Translation of the Four Gospels from the Syriac of the Sinaitic Palimpsest Agnes Smith Lewis 1894

The Restored New Testament by James M Pryce 1914

Gospel of Matthew by WJ Aislabie 1834 (pages missing)

The Coptic Version of the New Testament, Volume 1, 1898

The Coptic Version of the New Testament, Volume 2, 1898

The Coptic Version of the New Testament, Volume 3, 1898

The Coptic Version of the New Testament, Volume 4, 1898

The gospel according to St. Mark : revised from the ancient Greek mss. unknown to the translators of the Authorized Version 1870

The Westminster version of the Sacred Scriptures, Volume 1 part 2

The Westminster version of the Sacred Scriptures, Volume 3

The Westminster version of the Sacred Scriptures, Volume 4 part 3

The Twofold New Testament by TS Green 1864

The Emphatic Diaglott by Benjamin F. Wilson 1864

St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians: With a Critical and Grammatical Commentary, and Revised Translation by Charles Ellicott 1864

A commentary, critical and grammatical, on St. Paul's Epistle to the Galatians, with a revised translation, by Charles J. Ellicott 1860

The Pastoral Epistles of St. Paul with a critical and grammatical commentary, and a revised translation 1869
by Charles J. Ellicott

St. Paul's First epistle to the Corinthians by Charles J. Ellicott

St. Paul's epistles to the Philippians, the Colossians and Philemon by Charles J. Ellicott 1888

A Critical and Grammatical Commentary on St. Paul's Epistles to the Thessalonians by Charles J. Ellicott 1858

A Paraphrase and Notes on the Revelation of St. John by Moses Lowman 1773

The Story of the Nazarene in Annotated Paraphrase by Noah Nowles Davis 1903

Revelation, a Paraphrase by TP Briggs 1892

A Paraphrase and Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews by A. McLean 1820 Volume 1

A Paraphrase and Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews by A. McLean 1820 Volume 2

A popular paraphrase on St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans By Rev Bromehead

Buy NowOnly $5.35 (I only ship to the United States)
 gdixierose

2 comments:

  1. Subject: How Well Trained are Bible Translators?


    We often hear accusations of too little training on behalf of Bible
    translations that people do not like, but what of the mainstream?

    "In the light of the argument so far, I am inclined, somewhat
    hesitantly, to call into question the judgment of Eugene Nida and
    others, who argue that good exegetes and grammarians make poor
    translators. Increasingly, they argue that translation projects
    should begin with stylists who enjoy some marginal knowledge of
    Greek and Hebrew but who are thoroughly competent in the receptor
    language, and then permit the specialists their say only at the
    cleaning-up stage. Quite clearly, the gifts and training of the
    stylists, or, more broadly, of the receptor-language specialists,
    are vital. But I wonder if grammarians and exegetes are dismissed
    too rapidly. Most field translators for such organizations Wycliffe
    Bible Translators (or SIL) and the American Bible Society have one
    theological degree, perhaps two-i.e., two or three years (i.e., four
    to six semester courses) of Greek and perhaps half that of Hebrew
    (or no Hebrew at all). Their problem, it may be, is not that they
    have too much Greek to be good translators, but too little. **I
    would go further and suggest that even many teachers of Greek and
    Hebrew in colleges, seminaries, and universities do not enjoy much
    facility in the language they are teaching.** These are precisely
    the kinds of people who are least likely to be sensitive to the
    demands of functional equivalence. How often, for example, have I
    taken second-year Greek students aside and plained at length how
    rarely a Greek participle should be rendered by an Engh participle,
    how many of the Greek connectives must find no formal equivalent in
    a specific English word but survive in the flow of the English
    sentence, and so forth. And I have learned that it is my best
    students in advanced exegesis and advanced grammar courses who learn
    such flexibility most thoroughly. To
    be good translators, they would benefit from further study in
    linguistics, socio-linguistics, and literary style; but at a guess,
    advanced competence in the source languages will not prove a
    hindrance but a strength in most cases, provided the teacher is
    aware of the linguistic complexities and subtleties that surround
    translation. It is the student of Greek and Hebrew who has a
    mechanical view of language who will have most difficulty grasping
    these elementary points and who
    in the name of fidelity will defend more "direct" translations, even
    when the result is largely incomprehensible to the target readers
    and hearers.

    One of the reasons I have suggested this alternative-that front-rank
    Bible translators need a good deal more training in Greek and
    Hebrew, not less -is to combat the drift in many academic circles
    toward less training in the source languages and toward so great a
    flexibility in translation that, as we have seen, "communication"
    becomes an ideal abstracted from the message to be communicated. New
    voices loudly insist there is an impregnable wedge between the
    meaning of the source and the meaning of the receptor. To provide at
    least some safeguards, we must encourage translators to pursue
    studies not only in linguistics and style but also in the languages,
    history, culture, symbolism, genre, and theology of the biblical
    documents. Only then is it possible to "fuse horizons" with high
    reliability and counteract the growing tide of relativism and
    arbitrariness."
    _The Challenge of Bible Translation_ p. 102

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Johannine Prologue in the Restored New Testament:

    The divine Thought inhered in the primordial Element,
    And proximate to the Unmanifested God was this divine Thought
    And verily the divine Thought was the secondary God

    In the primordial Element, proximate to the Unmanifested, was
    this manifested God.
    Through him was emanated the vast Universe,
    And not one single thing was emanated save through him.
    That which has been emanated in him was Life as pure quintessence.
    And the Life was the Light of the eternal Men.

    The Light shines forth in the chaotic Darkness,
    And the Darkness can not grasp or hold it back.
    There appeared a Seer—loannes was his name
    Who was the Messenger of the Manifested God
    For witness he came, to bear witness about the Light,
    That through him all might walk the shining path.
    He himself was not the Light of the divine Thought,
    But he was sent to bear witness of the Light.

    That was the true Light which lights every man coming into the
    world.
    He was in the world, and the world was emanated through him.
    And yet the world of mortals had no knowledge of him
    To abodes that are his own he came, but they who are his own
    received him not.
    But as many as received him he empowered to become Sons of God,
    Sons who are not born, as mortals are, of human parents.
    Neither from woman's body nor from man's desire.
    But of the Manifested God's all-potent will.

    Thus in the Seer the divine Thought incarnates as the indwelling
    Self;
    And Seers behold his haloed form. Beauty and Truth embodied—
    The effulgence of the Self-born, whose Father is himself.
    Of his effulgence every Seer receives, beauty ever imaging beauty.
    Forever invisible remains the Unmanifested God
    The Son, self-born from the World-Mother's womb.
    Alone can make Him known to mortal man
    And to this Manifested God loannes bears witness'.

    ReplyDelete